National Film and Video Foundation
The National Film and Video Foundation is a statutory body funded by the Department of Arts and Culture to help develop the South African film and video industry.

For the 10th year in a row, South Africa’s National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) has received an unqualified report from the auditor general for the year ended 31 March 2010. The success is attributed its effective governance structures with clear policies that make it one of the most stable institutions in the arts sector.

Charlotte Mampane, chair of the NFVF council, is pleased to have continued the tradition but disappointed by the fact that the foundation was not given the chance to physically present its previous annual report to parliament in the previous year.

“This lack of interaction denies the NFVF an opportunity to interact and account to parliament, even if it’s all good work that the institution has to communicate,” Mampane says the report.

The NFVF is a statutory body funded by the Department of Arts and Culture to help develop the South African film and video industry. In the 2009/10 financial year, the foundation’s budget was R37.9-million (US$5.5-million).

With a staff of 26, it is responsible for supporting the film and video industry by granting funds for the production of film projects, granting bursaries and supporting training projects, and promoting South African film and video projects to local and international markets.

In the year under review, as stipulated in the NFVF Act, the foundation had to spend not more than 25% of its budget on operational expenses. Of its operational budget, 22% was spent on compliance. The NFVF spent 18% on training and bursaries, 6% on script development, 2% on research, 58% on distribution and marketing, and a further 17% was spent on production and development of films.

Films benefiting from NFVF funds included as Shirley Adams, Father Christmas Doesn’t Come Here and Skin. These were all released in 2010 to critical success good reviews from international film festivals.

In order to increase its funding, the foundation established a new unit as an innovation hub to find new ways of investing and developing a commercially viable business in the industry. In its pioneering year, the unit acquired the distribution rights to Skin. Through the business case created by the unit, the NFVF is hoping to oversee the exhibition platform, which will result in providing services to the vastly under serviced areas, as the Act mandates.